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1 1 NAME Bethiah or Bertha /COOLEY/
2 GIVN Bethiah or Bertha
2 SURN COOLEY


!NAME: 1. Family Group Sheet. 2. Letter from John C. Chapin BIRTHD AY & MARRIAGE: The Pioneers of Massachusetts, By Charles Henry Pope, Balt imore Genealogical Publishing Co. 1965, p. 116

!SOURCE: LDS Ancestral File. 
Cooley, Bethia (I328)
 
2 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. King, Bradly Norman (I55)
 
3 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. King, Cameron Micheal (I888)
 
4 1 NAME Capt. Isaac /Allerton/
2 GIVN Capt. Isaac
2 SURN Allerton


!SOURCE: A History of The Allerton Family in The United States, 1585 to 1 885, and A Genealogy of the Descendants of Isaac Allerton, "Mayflower Pil grim," Plymouth, Mass., 1620. By Walter S. Allerton, New York City, 1888 . Revised and Enlarged By Horace True Currier, Chicago. Published By Samu al Waters Allerton, Chicago. Illinois, 1900. p. 13-30

!SOURCE: A History of The Allerton Family in The United States, 1585 to 1 885, and A Genealogy of the Descendants of Isaac Allerton, "Mayflower Pil grim," Plymouth, Mass., 1620. By Walter S. Allerton, New York City, 1888 . Revised and Enlarged By Horace True Currier, Chicago. Published By Samu al Waters Allerton, Chicago. Illinois, 1900. p. 13-30

Isaac Allerton: "The exact time or place of Isaac Allerton's birth is no t at present known to his descendants in the United States. He probably b elonged to an old and honorable family of mixed Saxon and Danish descent , that had been for many centuries located in the south-eastern part of E ngland, many representatives of which are still to be found in Suffolk an d adjacent counties. He was born between the years 1583 and 1585, and re sided at London for some time prior to removing to Holland, in 1609. It i s said, however that he was about twenty-six years old when he went to Ho lland and about thirty-seven when he came to Plymouth. The records of S t Dionis Backchurch, London, give the marriage of Edward Allerton, of tha t Parrish, to Rose Davis, of St. Peter's, Cornhill, 14 February, 1570-80 . Edward Died in 1590. Rose survived him six years and died in 1596. Poss ibly they were the parents of Isaac Allerton and his sister Sarah. He i s generally admitted to have been the wealthiest of all the pilgrims, an d is one of the few among them to whom Bradford and other contemporaneou s writers always give the prefix 'Mr.', which in those days was used as a n index of of superior family or respectability. He was also one of the t hree upon whom the privilege of citizenship was conferred by the city o f Leyden, his associates in this honor, which was given February 5, 1614 , being William Bradford, afterwards Governor of the Plymouth colony, an d Degory Priest, his brother-in-law. He was first married, as we learn fr om the records in the Staathuis or City hall of Leyden, on November 4, 16 11 to Mary Norris, of Newbury, in England. The witnesses to this Marriag e were Edward Southworth, Richard Masterson and Randolph Tickens; for th e bride, Anna Fuller and Dillon Carpenter. "No one in the whole Leyde n colony was more efficient and eminently useful in all the preparation s for their departure for America. At the time of the sailing of the Pilg rims he had four children, all born in Holland, three whom, Barthelomew , Remember and Mary, came over with their parents in the Mayflower, whil e the youngest, Sarah, remained behind and came over later with her aunt , Sarah Priest, Sister of Isaac Allerton, Who was married first in Londo n to John Vincent. She married Second in Leydenat the same time of her b rother's marriage, Degory Priest, (Hatter from London). He died in Plymou th, Mass., 1 January 1620-1. His widow, who had remained behind, marrie d third at Leyden, Godbert Godbertson, who came to Plymouth with his wif e in the Ann, 1623, and both died in 1633.
"As was natural at that season of the year, the voyage on the Mayflo wer was a long and stormy one, and disease and death were already at wor k among the over-crowded passengers of the little vellel, when on Novembe r 9, at break of day the sandy hills of Cape Codd became visible on the w estern horezon. Their original design had been to make their settlement n ear the mouth of the Hudson, and accordinglythey put about at once to th e south, but soon found themselves entangled in the shoals of the dangero us coast, and being all of them, especially the women and children, heart ily sick of confinement whithin the narrow limits of the little vessel, t he desire to be once more on land bacame too strong to be resisted. The c aptain also, having been bribed by the Dutch West India Company nmot to c arry them to the Hudson, declared that further progress to the south wa s impossible and putting about once more to the north, they doubled the n orthern extremity of the Cape next day, and came to anchor in Cape Cod ha rbor to ride out a storm. "This land , upon which they had now decide d to settle, being in the forty-second degree of latitude was without th e territory of the Virginia company, and thereforethe charter they held b ecame useless; and some symptons of faction and of an inclination throw o ff all authority appearing among the servants who had been hired in Engla nd. It was thought best by the seaders of the Colony that they should ent o into an associationfor self government and bind themselves to be govern ed by the will of the majority; and accordingly, on the 11th day of Novem ber, 1620 (old style) there was drawn, on the lid of a chest on board o f the Mayflower, at Cape-Codd, and signed by forty-one of the principal m en of the first band of Pilgrims, a platform of government known as the C ompact, and which gave these people the claim of being the first 'Signers ' of the now United States of America. The following is the full text o f the Compact:
'IN YE NAME OF GOD. AMEN'
'We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sove reigne Lord, King James, by ye grace of God, of Great Britaine, Franc e and Ireland, King, defender of ye faith, etc., having undertaken fo r ye glory of God and and advancement of ye Christian faith, and Honou r of our King and Countrie, a voyage to plant ye first cononie in ye no rthern parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly, and mutually , in ye presence of God, and of one another, covenant and combine ourselv es togeather into a civil body politik for our better ordering and pres ervation and furtherance of ye end aforesaid, and by vertue hearof to e nacte, constitute and frame such just and equal lawes, ordinances, acts , constitutions and offices from time to time, as shall be thought mos t meete and convenient for ye generall good of ye Colonie, unto which w e promise all due submission and obedience. In witnes wherof we have he reunder subscribed our names at Cape-Codd ye 11 of November in ye raign e of our Sovereigne Lord, King James of England, France and Ireland ye ei ghteenth, and of Scotland ye fiftie-fourth Ano Dom. 1620'
"Isaac Allerton was the fifth signer of the Compact, the names of wh ich precede his being those of John Carver, William Bradford, Edward Wins low, and Elder William Brewser (afterward being his Fater-in-law). His br other-in-law, degory priest, was the twenty-ninth signer. They remaine d at anchor in Cape Cod Harbor for five weeks, during which time the me n made many excursions to explore the surrounding country, while the wome n were taken on shore to wash the clothing. Finally, Having selected a pl ace for their settlement, on Monday, December 22, 1620 (11th of December , 1620, O.S.), a date which by their act has been rendered one of the lan dmarks of history, they landed at Plymouth, and at once set about the ere ction of a store-house for their goods, and dwellings for themselves. Bu t even before their landeng several of their number had died, and althoug h the winter proved to be an unusually mild one, it was still far more se vere than those to which had been accustomed, and this together with thei r enfeebled condition after the confinement of th voyage and the want fo r proper food and shelter, caused such sickness amoung the colonists tha t at times there were no more than six or seven of them well enough to nu rse the sick, and by the coming April fory-fou or nearly one-half, had di ed, and among them were Carver, the first governor, and his wife, and Mar y the wife of Isaac Allerton, who died February 25th, 1621. While on th e Mayflower in the Harbor of Cape Cod, She had been delivered of a child , still-born, and the hardships and privations of the terrible winter pro ved too much for her strength thus enfeebled.
"The first entry in the records of the Plymouth Colony is an imcompl ete list of 'The Meersteads and Garden Plottes' assigned to those who cam e out on the Mayflower, at the first division of land. Each of these 'Gar den Plottes' contained one 'aker.' The List and diagram is as follows:
I I
I I
I T I The South Side
I h I
I e I Peter Brown.
I I John Goodman.
I S I Mr Brewster.
I t I__________________________________________ _ The North Side
I r Highway.
I e --------------------------------------------- ----
I e I
I t I John Billington.
I I Mr Isaac Allerton.
I I Francis Cooke.
I I Edward Winslow.
I I
"It will be noticed That the honorable prefix 'Mr.' is here given t o Brewster and Allerton only.
"The Street is now called Leyden street and leads from the harbor wes tward.
"It is probable that Isaac Allerton built a house on his 'Garden Plo tt,' but if he did he did not occupy it during the entire period of hes r esidence in Plymouth, for in 1635, he lived at Rocky Nook, on Jones' Rive r in Kingston, in a house which he afterwards sold 'to my well beloved so nne-in-law Thomas Cushman,' the location of which is still pointed out ne ar the celebrated Elder's spring.
"In March the colonists had grave apprehension of trouble with India ns. On the night of the twenty second and attack was expected and watc h was kept, but there was no appearance of hostility, and as the old chro nicle says,' The next day, Friday, Captain Standish and Mr Allerton wen t venturously to visit King Massasoit, and were received by him after hi s Manner. He gave them 3 or 4 groundnuts and some tobacco.'
"As the result of this visit a treaty of peace was concluded, whick h eld good for more than fifty years.
"In April, Governor Carver died, and William Bradford was then chose n Governor, and Isaac Allerton Assistant Governor, a position which he he ld until 1624, and probably longer. "In September, 1621, a party o f ten, including Isaac Allerton, went by water to explore what is now th e harbor of Boston, and to visit the Indians who lived in that vicinity , and on this trip the first headland at Nantasket , at the entrance to t he harbor was called Point Allerton, a name which it still retains, altho ugh it has sometimes been spelled alderton; and adjoining hill in the tow n of Hull was also known for as Allerton Hill. For several years after th e landing of the colonists Isaac Allerton was engaged, as were all the re st, in building houses and barns for shelter, in clearing and dilling th e soil, and in managing with the other men, the affairs of the little set tlement. We find him participating in another dividion of land in the sp ring of 1624, when seven acres, 'on the south side of the Brook to the Ba ywards,' were set off for him.
"In 1626, He married Fear Brewster, the daughter of Elder Eilliam Br ewster, who had come over in the ship with her sister, Patience, in 1623 . She was a woman of pleasing appearance and of a pious disposition, as w e are told, and she is interesting to us as being the of that Isaac aller ton, the second of the name, from whom the Allerton family is descended . She died December 12, 1634.
"In the fall of 1626, Isaac Allerton was sent by the colonist to Eng land, to obtain certain supplies for them of which they were in great nee d, and to arrange if possible a composition with Adventurers, as those me n who had advanced the funds for the colony were called. Bradford says th at he was selected as the agent of the colonists in this matter as 'bein g well qualified by education and experience, and having the confidence o f the Merchants of London,' and these advantages of education and experie nce in the affairs of the world, enabled him to manage the affairs of th e colony with signal success for a time, but beyond dought the natural ca uses of the disagreements which afterward took place
"In the spring of 1627 he returned with the draft of a composition , 'drawn by the best counsel of law they could get to make it firm.' By t his contrace, which was dated at London, November 15, 1626, the Adventure rs sold to the Colony their entire interestin the settlement for $1800, ' to be paid at the Royal Exchange, at London, every 'Michaelmas, in nine a nual installments $200, each,' and it was provided that they were to forf eit thirty shillings per week, for every weed the debt was not paid afte r it was due. This composition was unanimously sanctioned, and Isaac Alle rton was at once sent back to England with full authority to ratify and c onfirm it.
"At the same time the entire trade of the colony for a period of si x years, was bound to William Bradford, Edward Winslow, Isaac Allerton, a nd several others, in consideration of their assuming the entire indebted ness, amounting in all to about $2400, and in addition they were to pay t he Colony $50 per annum in hoes and shoes.
"Having satisfactorily arranged the composition with the adventurer s and paid them their first installment of 200 pounds, and having paid ot her debts, Isaac Allerton returned to Plymouth in the sprinmg of 1628, br inging with him a supply of goods, and also a patent for a trading statio n on the Kennebec, but when they came to compare the patent with the regi on to which it applied, they found it 'so strait and ill bounded,' that h e was again sent to England, for the third time, to obtain the enlargemen t and correction of this patent, and also a new patent for Plymouth, an d to arrange for the removal of the remainder of the church at Leyden. H e was compelled to return to Plymouth without accomplishing all he had be en desired to do, but being immediately sent back again, in august, 1629 , he had better success, and obtained the desired patent January 29, 1630 . He went to england several times after this on business for the colonis ts or for himself, crossing the ocean in all seven times.
"About this time, 1630, began his trouble with the colonists, or rat her with Governor Bradford, the true cause of which it is difficult to as certain, and with a full account of which I shall not weary the reader. B radford's version can be found, written with all the energy and rancour o f his narrow and prejudiced mind, in the pages of his famous journal, bu t it is a series of complaints rather than a statement of facts, and evid ently fails to state the true grounds of the disagreement. We might offse t the complainings of Bradford with the statements of those who were bett er able to know the true value of Isaac Allertons's services to the colon y; thus James Sherley, one of the Adventurers and a steadfast friend of t he colonists, writes, March 8, 1629, 'He hath bneen a truly honest frien d to you all, either there or here. And if any do, as I know some of the m are apt to speak ill of him, believe them not.' and again on March 19 , 1629, he writes, in a letter signed also by Timothy Hatherly, a frien d of the colonists at fLondon, 'But the Lord so blessed his labours (eve n beyond expectation in these evil days), as he obtained the love and fav our of great men in repute and place, he got granted all Mr. Winslow desi red in hes letters to me and more also. ' Manyh similar statements migh t be quoted from letters and writings of other friends to the colony in E ngland, while on the other hand Bradford complains bitterly that too muc h mony had been expended in obtaining a charter, and that he had sometime s endeavored to further his own interests rather than those of the colony . But those who care to examine into the merits will inevitably come to t he conclusion reached by a painstaking and impartial historian, that 'A s an agent Mr. Allerton appears to have been indefatigable in his attempt s to promote the interests of his employers. He was a person of umcommo n activity, address and enterprise.'
"The true cause, however of this difficulty with the colonists and w ith bradford in particular, is undoubtedly to be found in the fact, tha t he was in mind, education and practice far more liberal than they, an d that while his associations in England with the merchants of London, an d the officers of the court and government tended to still further broade n and liberalize his views, their seclusion in the forests and among th e dangers of the little settlement at Plymouth was most admirably calcula ted to make still narrower and more bigoted natures that were already inc lined to the most puritanical of views.
"We know that the church at Leyden took offence at the liberal tende ncies of Isaac Allerton, that the colonists were greatly offended at hi s apparently innocent mistake in employing the notorious Morton of Merr y Mount as his secretary, although in these days, Mouton would almost pas s for a Saint, and when he became known as a firm friend of Roger William s, and was found to have sheltered and protected many of the oppressed an d persecuted QSuakers, the cup of his iniquity was indeed full in the min ds of the colonists, and we are not surprised to hear that about 1636, h e left Massachusetts in consequence of the religious intolerance of the p eople, and went to New Amsterdam to live. Like most of his descendants, I saac Allerton, though a just and fair minded man, was of a quick temper , apt to resent an affront, and impetuous in acting upon his impulses, an d therrefore, when once a difference had arisen between him and a majorit y of the Plymouth colonists, who were no doubt well represented by thei r narrow and dogmatic governor, there was little possibility of any recon ciliation, even had there been more in common in their natures and thei r ways of life and thought.
"Moreover, he had given great offence by embarking extensively in bu siness which conflicted in many ways with the industries of the colony. H e was admittedlyu the first merchant of New England, ant the founder of t he coasting trade and the fishing industry. We find early mention of vess els owned by him, and he was the first to welcome Winthrop and his compan ny to the shores of the New World. Winthrop says in his journal, under da te of June 12, 1630, 'About four in the morning we were near our port, w e shot off two pieces of ordinance and sent our skiff to Mr. Pierce (whic h lay in the Harbor and had been there ----- days before); about an hou r after Mr. Allerton came on board us in a shallop as he was sailing to P emaquid.' In 1632 he attempted to set up a rival trading station on the K ennebec, and also to establish one on the Penobscot, but both these enter priseswere unsuccesful, the latter station being broken up bu the Frenc h in 1634. In 1633, Winthrop records that he fished with light boats at M arble Harbor, and he is justly regarded as the foundder of Marblehead, fo r he made that place the headquarters of his fishing fleet, built a larg e warehous, and resided there a great part of the time with his son-in-la w Moses Maverick, until hes liberal views again brought him into troubl e with the General Court, as they had previously done with his old associ ates at Plymouth, and was given 'leave to depart from Marblehead.'
"That he was liberal in other matters as well as in religion, we kno w from the following extracts from the records, under date of December 2, 1633: 'Wheras, Mr. Will. Bradford was appointed in the behalf of the Cour t to enter upon the estate of Godbert Godbertsonand Zarah his wife, and t o discharge the debts of the said Godbert so far as his estate will mak e good. And whereas, the greatest part of his deebts are owing to Mr. Isa ack Allerton of Plyhm., Mercht., Late brother of the said Zarah. The sai d Isaack hath given leave to all his creditors to be fully discharged bef ore he receives any thing of his particular debts to himself, desiring ra ther to lose all thatn other men should lose any.'
"But about this misfortunes began to come thick and heavy upon him . In 1634 his trading house at Machias was taken by the Franch and Indian s and destroyed by fire with all its contents. In February of the same ye ar, 'Mr. Cradock's hose at Marblehead was burnt down about midnight, ther e being in it Mr. Allertonand many fishermen whom he had employed that se ason.' The same year, returning from a trading voyage to Port Royal, 'hi s pinace was cast away and entirely lost;' and on December 12, 1634, hi s wife died at Plymouth.
"In 1635 his misforturnes continued. In March, he was notified to Le ave Marblehead on account of his religious views, and in May he transferr ed all his houses, buildings and stages for the curing fish at that plac e to his son-in-law, Moses Maverick. In august a bark belonging to him, w hich had been hired to transport Rev. Mr. Avery and his family, from Newb ury to Marblehead, was lost at Cape Anne, and twenty-one persons perished , and in 1636, while returning from Penobscot, he was himself shipwrecked .
"From 1636 to 1646, he resided most of the time at New Amsterdam, wh ere he was engaged in the coasting and tobacco trades, having a warehous e on the East River, somewhere near where the foot of Maiden Lane now is . That his intelligence and enterprise were thoroughly appreciated by th e Dutch settlers is shown by the circumstance that when, in 1643, a Counc il of eight were chosen from among the citezens, nominally to assist Gove rnor Kieft, but in reality to manage him, Isaac Allerton was one of the n umber. While living at New Amsterdam, however, he made many voyages to vi rginia and even to the West Indies, and frequently visited the New Englan d Colonies; and notwithstanding the treatment he had received he oftenren dered good service to such residents of the Massachusetts settlement as c ame in his way. Thus Winthrop writes in 1643: 'Three ministers which wer e sent to Virginia were wrecked on Long Island; Mr. Allerton, of New Have n, being there took great pains and care of them, and procured them a ver y good pinace and all things necessary.'
"And in a letter from one John haynes to Governor Winthrop, it is sta ted, 'There is late news by a vessel that came to the Dutch and from then ce to New Haven, by Mr. Allerton. The substance thus: that there has bee n a great battle between the King and Parliament forces.'
"In 1644, he wrecked at Scituate, on his way from New Haven to the Co lonies, and at this time we find the first mention of his third wife. Th e date of this marriage is not known nor the surname and residence of hi s wife; her first name was Johanna, and hes is generally thought to hav e married her at New Haven, but more probably she came from Marblehead o r Salem. She appears to have been a woman of a most excellent character , and she outlived her husband many years. At the time of this marriage I saac Allerton must have been nearly sixty years of age and the union prov ed a childless one.
"About 1646 Isaac Allerton became a permanent resident of New Haven , and at that placehe lived the remainder of his life, although making oc casional trips to New Amsterdam and Massachusetts. He built himself a 'gr and house on the Creek, with four porches,' on a home lot of two acres. O ne of the 'famous spots' in New Haven is the North-west corner of the Uni on and Fair streets where the house stood. A tablet has been placed on th e present building bearing this full inscrtiption:--'Isaac Allerton, a pa ssenger on the Mayflower,' lived on this ground from 1646 to 1659.'
"It was in this house that the Regicide Judges Whalley and Goffe fou nd temporary shelter and conceaalment in 1661. Stiles, his History of th e Regicide Judges, says that they were protected by Mrs. Eyres, but hes i s in error, for, having been born in 1653 she was but eight years old a t the time.
"It was Mrs. Johanna Allerton, the widow of Isaac Allerton, of the M ayflower, and Elizabeth Allerton, daughter of her son-in-law, Isaac, wh o received and sheltered the judges. "An old plan of New Haven in 174 8, shows the house of Simon Eyres, a descendant of his in this location , and mentions Isaac Allerton as the original owner. When he lived ther e the house stood on a gentle declivity sloping down to the harbor in fro nt and to the creed on the west, affording a view of the waters of the So und even to the coast of long Island, and it must have been just such a h ome as would be most pleasant for the last years of one who had been so l ong a follower of the sea.
"We find many mentions of Captain Isaac Allerton, as he is there cal l, in the old records of New Haven.
"On March 10, 1647, the names of the people as they were seated in t he meeting house were put upon record, and we find 'Thomas Nash, Mr. Alle rton and Bro. Perry,' assigned to 'the second seat of the cross seats a t the end.' It is to be noteced that as usual he is here given the honora ble prefix 'Mr.'
"The following account of a little difficulty which Mrs. Allerton ha d with the officials of the town, during her husband's absence upon one o f his voyages, shows that human nature exzpecially as it develops itsel f in petty officers, was the same than as now. At a court hels at New Hav en, August 6, 1650, 'Mr. Allertons' fence was complained of. Jno. Coope r and the marshall informed the court that Mrs. Allerton hath had notic e of it three times and yet the fence is not mended, but two places remai n defective as John Cooper says.' The court ordered that Mr. Allerton pa y two shillings for the two defective places, each time they have so warn ed. The fence does not appear to have been mended, for the same reprot i s repeated from one court to another, and additional fine of two shillin g ordered each time, until December, when Mr. Evans SAith Mrs. Allerton d esired him to acquaint the Court with the case.' The explanations being t hat there had been a long misunderstanding between her ant the location o f the fence complained of. The Court they 'must rest on John Cooper's rep ort because he is in a public trust in this matter of fence, and therefor e it is ordered that Mrs. Allerton pay for the two defects, two shillings .'
"The misfortunes which had pressed so thickly upon him during the las t years of his residence in Massachusetts, as to gain for him the mane o f the 'unlucky,' do not appear to have entirely deserted him yet, for w e find the folloing record under date of November 2, 1652: 'Robert Pain e and William Meaker were complained of the absence from training. The Co urt was informed that Mr. Allerton that morning sent to Goodyears to ge t them free because of some urgent occasion about his vessel. The Court c onsedering that he did send to ask leave, and it was upon that occasion , and the time the vessel hath lain, and the afflicted state of Mr. Aller ton otherwise, did for this tiem pass it over without a fine.'
"Isaac Allerton was now approaching the threescore years and ten, whi ch are the generally accepted limit of human existence; his life had bee n one of hardship, activity and exposure; his son Isaac was now grown t o manhood, and able to mange in great part the extensive, although not ve ry successful business in which had been so long ingaged, and for the las t few years of his life he seems to have resided most of the time quietl y in his house on the Bay.

"He died about the beginning of the year 1659, being then in all prob ability nearly seventy-five years old. He was buried in the old Burying G round at New Haven, Occuping the square in the very heart of the presen t city, upon which stands the Old State House and three churches. No monu ment or grave-stone has ever been found, nor is there any record of one b eing among those that were removed to the New Cemetery. At that time grav e-stones were not made in the country, and the trouble and expense of imp orting them was so great that but few of the durable material were used . But there can be littleor no doubt that the dust of one of the Pilgri m Fathers reposes beneath the Elms of New Haven's public square. An Inven tory of his estat, taken February 12, 1659, was presented to the Court Ap ril 5, 1659. 'Mrs. Allerton being asked if there was any Will by her husb and, answered yes there was, but she thought her son had it with him wh o was now gone from home.' On July 5 his son, having returned, presente d the Will, but the estate being badly insolvent the business was referre d to the Court of Magistreates in October. At that Court the writing pres ented as the last Will and Testament of Isaac Allerton, although informaa l and without date, was sworn to by John Harriman and Edward Preston, th e subscribing witnesses, as sealed and subscribed by Mr. Allerton decease d, 'whilst he had the use of his understanding and memory in a competen t degree.'
"This Will was little else than a few memoranda of debts due to him , which he desired his son Isaac and his wife to receive and pay out to h si creditorsas far as the would go, and it is onlyh valuable to us as sho wing the nature and extent of his business. It begins thus: 'An account o f the debts due at the Dutch,' meaning at New Amsterdam.
"Among the debts are, '700 guilders by Tho. Hall by arbitration of Ca ptain Willett and Augustus harman, about Captain Scarlet which I paid out ;''900 guilders from John Peterson the Bore as by George Woolseys book wi ll appear.' On item which helps to fix the date of this Will Appproximate ly is a Memorandum of a sum owing him from Henry Brassen, for the rent fo r eighteen months from October 1656, to the last of May 1658, for three r ooms for three guilders a week. After the clause contituting his son an d wife trustees, he adds, as if it were an after-thought, a memorandum o f 'a parcel fo book lace in Captain Willett's hans 1300 and odd Guilders. 'Next ho this is the place of the seal, and it concludes with these two s entences: My Brother Brewster owes me four score pounds and odd, as the o bligations appear.' 'Besides all my debts in delaware Bay and Virginia, w hich in my books will appear, and in Barbadoes what he can get ' Isaac Allerton, Senior.'
"No portrait of Isaac Allerton has come down to us, but he is said t o have been slightly above the average height, of a spare but muscular fr ame, with dark hair and beard, a clear complexion and strongly marked fea tures, a good looking rather than a handsome man. In the great mafority o f his descendants there caan be noticed a great similarity of developmen t in the upper portion of the head and face, more noticeable in the foreh ead, eyes and nose, and there can be no doubt that these physical marks , together with certain well defined traits of character, have descende d to us from our common ancestor. He was superior to all of his associate s on the Mayflower, except possibly Winslow, and one or two others, in ed ucation, and superior to all of them in knowledge of the world and famili arity with business, and as his experience in these matters was so much g reater, his mental horizon was far wider and his views more liberal and m ore tolerant of the o. The only wonder is that he was able to agree wit h them as long as he did. The services which he rendered to the Colony ha ve been fully appreciated by a few careful historians only; poetry and ro mance have combined to spread the fame od Standish the soldier, or of Ald en the clerk, while the record of Allerton's work is buried in the dust y recesses of English offices, but had there been no Standish among the C olonists there could have been found others as competent to battle with t he Indians, while it is hardly possible that any man among them could hav e accomplished all that Isaac Allerton did in London, and it is not too m uch to say that the very existence of the Plymouth Colony depended fo r a time upon the success of his negotiotions there.
"For two centuries and a third the dust of the Pilgrim leader has slu mbered beneath the elms of New Haven, , but his memory is fresh to-day an d will always endure, not only in the hearts of his descendantsbut in com mon with his heroic companions of the Mayflower, his name will be foreve r cherished by the entire people of that mighty nation, the corner-ston e of whose foundations was so deeply snd so enduringlaid by the pilgrim s of Plymouth." Extract taken from:
SOURCE: A History of The Allerton Family in The United States, 1585 to188 5, and A Genealogy of the Descendants of Isaac Allerton, "Mayflower Pilgr im," Plymouth, Mass., 1620. By Walter S. Allerton, New York City,1888. Re vised and Enlarged By Horace True Currier, Chicago. Published By Samual W aters Allerton, Chicago. Illinois, 1900. p. 13-28

Isaac Allerton "married first in Leyden, Holland, November 4, 1611, Mar y Norris of Newbury, Eingland, Who died in Plymouth, Mass., February 25 , 1625. Married second in 1626 Fear, daughter of Elder William Brewster . She did in Plymouth, Mass. December 12, 1634. He married third, prior t o 1644, Johanna, whose Maiden name is not known, she survied him many yea rs, and died in New Haven, Conn., 1682. He died in New Haven 'in the begi nning of the year 1659.' The Inventory of his estate was taken February 1 2, 1659, and was presented to the court April 5, 1659. 
Allerton, Isaac (I478)
 
5 1 NAME Elizabeth /Hanson/
2 GIVN Elizabeth
2 SURN Hanson 
Hansen, Elizabeth (I1265)
 
6 1 NAME Elizabeth Sarah /Brewster/
2 GIVN Elizabeth Sarah
2 SURN Brewster 
Brewster, Elizabeth (I1183)
 
7 1 NAME Fannie //
2 GIVN Fannie


!SOURCE: LDS Archive record Sister in Law to Ancester. No other informati on available. 
Lafferty, Florence (I106)
 
8 1 NAME Johnathan /Brewster/
2 GIVN Johnathan
2 SURN Brewster


!SOURCE: A History of The Allerton Family in The United States, 1585 to 1 885, and A Genealogy of the Descendants of Isaac Allerton, "Mayflower Pil grim," Plymouth, Mass., 1620. By Walter S. Allerton, New York City, 1888 . Revised and Enlarged By Horace True Currier, Chicago. Published By Samu al Waters Allerton, Chicago. Illinois, 1900. p. 115-118

!TEMPLE ORDINANCES: Patron Notification Form dated 4 Dec 1991

!BIRTH: 1. "A Descent from Henry III to Judith Lewis Gibbins of Saco Main e" by Walter Goodwin Davis, B.A., L.L.B., of Portland, Maine. Ar ticle in "The American Genealogist, Number 73, July 1942, Vol. xi x, No.1. 2. "A History of the Allerton Family in the United State s 1585 to 1885" by Walter S. Allerton, New York City, 1888; Publi shed by Samuel Waters Allerton, Chicago, Illinois, 1900. (Revise d and enlarged by Horace True Currier.)

!MARRIAGE: Same as above

!DEATH: Over 110 Years since birth.

!Jonathan came to New England in the "Fortune" in 1621. He had eight chi ldren. 
Brewster, Jonathan (I512)
 
9 1 NAME Mrs. Mary /Bement/
2 GIVN Mrs. Mary
2 SURN Bement 
Severance, Mary (I1343)
 
10 1 NAME Robert Ashley /Horton/
2 GIVN Robert Ashley
2 SURN Horton 
Ashley, Robert (I1048)
 
11 1 NAME William /Lewis Jr./
2 GIVN William
2 SURN Lewis Jr.






!Family History Library archival record William was a Captain.

Lewisiana V 1 p 38, v 4 p 78, Records of Farmington, Connecticut

Submitter: Ethel C. Butt 
Lewis, William (I1050)
 
12 1 REFN 000-2526-0472
1 _SUBQ Membership Record of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day S aints.
1 _BIBL Membership Record of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day S aints. 
Source (S2)
 
13 1 REFN 212683
1 _SUBQ Timothy Eric King, birth certificate no. 4396 (07/29/1961), Kern County Recorder, Bakersfield, Kern, California, United States
1 _BIBL Timothy Eric King, birth certificate no. 4396 (07/29/1961), Kern County Recorder, Bakersfield, Kern, California, United States 
Source (S1)
 
14 1 _SUBQ International Genealogical Index [IGI] (Salt Lake City : Family History Library)
1 _BIBL International Genealogical Index [IGI] (Salt Lake City : Family History Library). 
Source (S10)
 
15 1 _SUBQ Ancestral File
1 _BIBL Ancestral File. 
Source (S43)
 
16 1 _SUBQ Ancestral File, GEDCOM file imported on 2 Jul 2001. (The Churc h Of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints)
1 _BIBL Ancestral File, GEDCOM file imported on 2 Jul 2001. (The Churc h Of Jesus Christ Of Latter Day Saints). 
Source (S16)
 
17 1 _SUBQ Compiled by Leota King Dawald (1993)
1 _BIBL Compiled by Leota King Dawald (1993). 
Source (S5)
 
18 1 _SUBQ Edited by J. R. Astleford, From Sea To Shining Sea - The Sory o f the Astleford Clan
1 _BIBL Edited by J. R. Astleford, From Sea To Shining Sea - The Sory o f the Astleford Clan. 
Source (S8)
 
19 1 _SUBQ Family Records/Genealogical Society of Utah
1 _BIBL Family Records/Genealogical Society of Utah. 
Source (S30)
 
20 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com. Created o n 09 Aug 2000. Imported on 4 May 2004.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by Ancestry.com, Ancestry.com. Created o n 09 Aug 2000. Imported on 4 May 2004. 
Source (S12)
 
21 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by Family Search - IGI, www.familysearch. com. Created on 20 May 2007. Imported on 20 May 2007.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by Family Search - IGI, www.familysearch. com. Created on 20 May 2007. Imported on 20 May 2007. 
Source (S24)
 
22 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by Family Search.org, www.familysearch.or g. Created on 26 April 2005. Imported on 26 Apr 2005.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by Family Search.org, www.familysearch.or g. Created on 26 April 2005. Imported on 26 Apr 2005. 
Source (S20)
 
23 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by IGI, LDS Church. Created on 7 Januar y 2007. Imported on 7 Jan 2007.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by IGI, LDS Church. Created on 7 Januar y 2007. Imported on 7 Jan 2007. 
Source (S47)
 
24 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by IGI, www.familysearch.com. Created o n 1 May 2005. Imported on 1 May 2005.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by IGI, www.familysearch.com. Created o n 1 May 2005. Imported on 1 May 2005. 
Source (S32)
 
25 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by IGI. Created on 1 May 2005. Imported o n 1 May 2005.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by IGI. Created on 1 May 2005. Imported o n 1 May 2005. 
Source (S41)
 
26 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File, www.familysearch.c om. Created on 11 NOV 2003. Imported on 11 Nov 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File, www.familysearch.c om. Created on 11 NOV 2003. Imported on 11 Nov 2003. 
Source (S17)
 
27 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 20 JU L 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 20 JU L 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003. 
Source (S35)
 
28 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 29 JU L 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 29 JU L 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003. 
Source (S36)
 
29 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 29 Jul y 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by LDS Ancestral File. Created on 29 Jul y 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003. 
Source (S38)
 
30 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file submitted by www.familysearch.com. Created on 20 Ju ly 2003. Imported on 20 Jul 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file submitted by www.familysearch.com. Created on 20 Ju ly 2003. Imported on 20 Jul 2003. 
Source (S34)
 
31 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file. Created on 15 Mar 2004. Imported on 4 May 2004.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file. Created on 15 Mar 2004. Imported on 4 May 2004. 
Source (S40)
 
32 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file. Created on 20 JUL 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file. Created on 20 JUL 2003. Imported on 25 Aug 2003. 
Source (S39)
 
33 1 _SUBQ GEDCOM file. Created on 30 April 2005. Imported on 30 Apr 2005.
1 _BIBL GEDCOM file. Created on 30 April 2005. Imported on 30 Apr 2005. 
Source (S27)
 
34 1 _SUBQ http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=G ET&db=:2837174&id=I204
1 _BIBL http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=G ET&db=:2837174&id=I204. 
Source (S50)
 
35 1 _SUBQ Internet
1 _BIBL Internet. 
Source (S18)
 
36 1 _SUBQ J Elwood Arnold,
(1980)
1 _BIBL J Elwood Arnold,
(1980). 
Source (S51)
 
37 1 _SUBQ Jeffery Galloway, jgalloway3@houston.rr.com, Jeff Galloway (http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=jlgalloway&id=I9048 )
1 _BIBL Jeffery Galloway, jgalloway3@houston.rr.com, Jeff Galloway (http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GED&db=jlgalloway&id=I9048 ). 
Source (S29)
 
38 1 _SUBQ LDS Archive Record submitted by other persons.
1 _BIBL LDS Archive Record submitted by other persons. 
Source (S4)
 
39 1 _SUBQ LDS FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File
1 _BIBL LDS FamilySearch Pedigree Resource File. 
Source (S13)
 
40 1 _SUBQ New England Historical & Geneological Society
1 _BIBL New England Historical & Geneological Society. 
Source (S25)
 
41 1 _SUBQ Orange Chapin, The Chapin Genealogy, Containing A Very Large Pr oportion Of The Descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin, Who Settled in Springf ield Mass in 1642. (Northampton: Printed by Metcalf & Company 1861)
1 _BIBL Orange Chapin, The Chapin Genealogy, Containing A Very Large Pr oportion Of The Descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin, Who Settled in Springf ield Mass in 1642. (Northampton: Printed by Metcalf & Company 1861). 
Source (S33)
 
42 1 _SUBQ Source Information:
Census Place Canton, Fillmore, Minnesota
Family History Library Film 1254619
NA Film Number T9-0619
Page Number 249B
1 _BIBL Source Information:
Census Place Canton, Fillmore, Minnesota
Family History Library Film 1254619
NA Film Number T9-0619
Page Number 249B. 
Source (S14)
 
43 1 _SUBQ Temple Ordinances/TempleReady
1 _BIBL Temple Ordinances/TempleReady. 
Source (S42)
 
44 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, LDS Family Sea rch - Ordinancy Index - IGI (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Sai nts)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, LDS Family Sea rch - Ordinancy Index - IGI (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Sai nts). 
Source (S11)
 
45 1 _SUBQ The Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, LDS Temple Ord inance Card
1 _BIBL The Church Of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, LDS Temple Ord inance Card. 
Source (S15)
 
46 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Temple Ready S ubmission Report (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Temple Ready S ubmission Report (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints). 
Source (S7)
 
47 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ordinance I ndex (TM) (1 Mar 1993 Edition)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ordinance I ndex (TM) (1 Mar 1993 Edition). 
Source (S45)
 
48 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ordinance I ndex (TM) (25 Jan 2000 Edition)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ordinance I ndex (TM) (25 Jan 2000 Edition). 
Source (S44)
 
49 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral Fil e (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Ancestral Fil e (R) (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998). 
Source (S3)
 
50 1 _SUBQ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Internationa l Genealogical Index (R) (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of April 26 , 2005)
1 _BIBL The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Internationa l Genealogical Index (R) (Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of April 26 , 2005). 
Source (S19)
 

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